Photo
Seeing this busker in downtown, Toronto was a haunting reminder of how individuals with disabilities were presented as circus freaks back in the day. I was not alive at the time and yet it still haunts me. I am not sure why this man is abnormally tall and I believe that because of his bone structure it is not the result of genetics alone. Whatever his diagnosis is, I find it fascinating how he chose to dress up as Spock (not sure if it is due to his face or his height…though the facial resemblance is uncanny). As indicated by the tub on his belt with ‘tips for pics’ written on it, he is trying to make money by presenting himself in costume. Is this person doing this because it is the only job that society allows him to do based on his appearance? Is he making money because of his diagnosis? Is there nothing more to this and am I making more of it than meets the eye? Who knows. It just struck me as interesting because I know that people with disabilities do attempt to make money on the streets either as buskers or beggars (depending on where you are in the world). What can we do to change this? Does society feel the need to change this? Let’s ask the hard questions.

Seeing this busker in downtown, Toronto was a haunting reminder of how individuals with disabilities were presented as circus freaks back in the day. I was not alive at the time and yet it still haunts me. I am not sure why this man is abnormally tall and I believe that because of his bone structure it is not the result of genetics alone. Whatever his diagnosis is, I find it fascinating how he chose to dress up as Spock (not sure if it is due to his face or his height…though the facial resemblance is uncanny). As indicated by the tub on his belt with ‘tips for pics’ written on it, he is trying to make money by presenting himself in costume. Is this person doing this because it is the only job that society allows him to do based on his appearance? Is he making money because of his diagnosis? Is there nothing more to this and am I making more of it than meets the eye? Who knows. It just struck me as interesting because I know that people with disabilities do attempt to make money on the streets either as buskers or beggars (depending on where you are in the world). What can we do to change this? Does society feel the need to change this? Let’s ask the hard questions.

Photo
This phone stand is an inclusive tool (for people of all abilities) because it is great for those who want to look at notes while making presentations or those who need to keep time. A tablet stand would be even more inclusive because of the size. If only all educators encourage use of such tools to be used in classrooms.

This phone stand is an inclusive tool (for people of all abilities) because it is great for those who want to look at notes while making presentations or those who need to keep time. A tablet stand would be even more inclusive because of the size. If only all educators encourage use of such tools to be used in classrooms.

Text

Autistic by Explanation

At breakfast this morning, one of the Counsellors at camp asked two brothers what kind of jobs they have. The elder able-bodied brother provided this explanation before telling the Counsellor what kind of job his brother had: He has Autism so he works at la di da place.

Why the label? Why do you need to highlight a person’s disability prior to providing further details/listing their achievements? Is the explanation REALLY necessary? His disability is not an invisible disability and even if it was, I don’t think an explanation is necessary nor appropriate. I recognize that his job is not a “regular job” that a mainstream able-bodied person of his age/maturity would participate in. What do you accomplish by pointing out his lack of ability in such a situation?

What really hit a nerve was that he did so nonchalantly while his brother was sitting right next to him. Not only are you identifying that he is “special” and does not fit in within society’s construction of the ”norm”, you are also doing it WHILE HE IS THERE. Where is the inclusivity? Why are you justifying why what he does is different, and perhaps unusual? If somebody did that to you, how would you feel?

Photo
Photo
goldenheartedrose:

Image description : neon pink heart suspended on a black string against a Grey striped shirt. Heart reads : “Autism is not a tragedy” with a puzzle piece symbol enclosed in a circle with a mark through it.

goldenheartedrose:

Image description : neon pink heart suspended on a black string against a Grey striped shirt. Heart reads : “Autism is not a tragedy” with a puzzle piece symbol enclosed in a circle with a mark through it.

Quote
"One of the biggest mistakes people make around accessibility is by starting only with access. I think access is a tool, a practice, an intervention for justice, but that access has to happen inside of a political container and that political container is disability justice; it has to happen for the sake of something. Access has to be done in service of something. What I mean is that access for the sake of access is not necessarily libratory, but access for the sake of connection, breaking isolation, love, justice and liberation is libratory."

Mia Mingus (via disabilityhistory)

(via rampyourvoice)

Text

Identify yourself first

I’m at a camp for the blind and at the dinner table, the Counsellors always identify themselves prior to serving us or clearing up the table. I’ve made it a habit to identify myself to individuals who have vision loss, but I feel the need to do so even with those who have perfect or almost perfect vision. In fact, I think it would be awesome if everyone did this with everyone, regardless of disABILITY. I’m going to try this and see what kind of reaction I receive from those who are able-bodied. YAY experiment!

You can try it out at your end. Simply start with, “Hi/Hello/Hey it’s <insert your name>.” Try it out.

Photoset

disabilityinkidlit:

In response to this Tumblr ask from rampyourvoice to gradientlair

Ten YA novels featuring disabled women of color as protagonists:

A Time to Dance by Padma Venkatraman
Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor
Dangerous by Shannon Hale
The Drowned Cities by Paolo Bacigalupi
The Shattering by Karen Healey
Pinned by Sharon G. Flake
Bleeding Violet by Dia Reeves
Otherbound by Corinne Duyvis
The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer by Michelle Hodkin
When Reason Breaks by Cindy L. Rodriguez

So far, we’ve only reviewed Dangerous at Disability in Kidlit; we’re unfortunately unable to vouch for the others. Hopefully this list will still prove useful to some, though—and if you’ve read any of these, please pitch in with your thoughts!

Link

realsocialskills:

People with certain disabilities often have heavy disability accents. Their speech can sound very different from the way most nondisabled people speak.

People with disabilities that affect communication are often pushed into separate programs, particularly in adulthood. Even when they are in the…

Photo
Photoset

afashionablecondition:

I don’t typically buy a new dresses just b/c they are on sale but this dress was so stand out, & inexpensive, I had to have it. It can obviously be dressed up or down and it doesn’t require a lot of thinking about accessories b/c,let’s face it, This is a very busy digi print that really can stand on it’s own merit. I will say I’m not 100% stoked on the polyester fabric, but my Mom always reminded me, from my first perm to buying a pair of shoes I loved that were half a size too small, sometimes “It hurts to be beautiful”. I don’t buy things that are too small for me any more with the pretense that “I’ll stretch them out/break them in” or “I can lose a couple pounds and THEN this will look GREAT” are long over & frankly were a fashion low point for me b/c feeling good, confident & COMFORTABLE in your clothes is the first step towards projecting your genuine style. I love this dress and will wear it as much as I can as long as the weather allows me to tolerate its slightly bummer fabric,

ASOS Dress 75% off + free shipping. Cropped Leggings: off brand. Thrifted Boots: Keen.

Quote
"

In the home, I had one nurse at a time, and she’d do everything I needed. Simple. I got used to that.

Here, even charge nurse RNs aren’t allowed to change the humidifier water bag, even though it’s essentially identical to the IV bags they could hang in their sleep, except easier. They can’t swap a water bag, because that is Sterile Water for Inhalation®, and though exactly identical to the sterile water nurses use for other things—wound care and so on—anything involving ventilation is the purview of Respiratory.
And since there are only two respiratory therapists for the North Campus, your lungs may dry out and form tumbleweeds before they get to it. It’s all fun and games until a tumbleweed blocks someone’s airway.

"

Nick Dupree, “That’s Not My Job” (Angry Rant)”

If you have not been in institutionalized and want to know more about what it’s like and what kind of policy changes could help, read Nick Dupree’s blog. 

(via disabilityhistory)

Photoset
Text

Some facts on Autism:

The increase in number of people who are being diagnosed with autism are believed to be those individual who have been undiagnosed to date, according to experts. YorkU spoke with 3 experts on sit on the York Autism Research Alliance (YARA).

One of the fastest-growing developmental disorders in the world

In the past 40 years, diagnoses have increased tenfold

In 1977, 1/2500 people were diagnosed with ASD whereas in 2009, 1/106 people were diagnosed

Males are four times as likely as females to have ASD

1/88 children is diagnosed, 1/54 are boys

Toronto District School Board now estimates that close to 3000 students are on the autism spectrum, Durham District School Board puts number 1/75

Source: article in YorkU Fall 2013 titled “Trying to demystify one of psychology’s most elusive developmental disorders: autism.”

Photo
invisibledisabilitychameleon:

peachykein:

My edit :)