disABILITYaware

Aug 27

Weed Pioneers Look To Save Epileptic Kids With New Medical Marijuana Strain -

"Charlotte’s Web" isn’t just a classic piece of children’s fiction, it’s also the name of one of the most coveted medical marijuana strains that is being used to treat children with epilepsy. The demand for Charlotte’s Web is so high by …

Aug 26

The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge isn't going anywhere -- but giving money to disease-specific charities is still a bad idea -

Clearly Ice Bucket Challenge fad has outlasted just about all expectations. It’s almost as though it were invented in some kind of viral factory.

“If you think there’s something important to be done to help people suffering from neurodegenerative diseases, then wouldn’t it make sense to include the vastly greater number of people with, say, multiple sclerosis as well? ALS is so rare—the association estimates that 5,600 new cases are diagnosed in the U.S. each year—that it seems a bit odd as the focus of a major national philanthropic phenomenon. Giving a charity anunexpected windfall doesn’t always have wonderfully positive results. So maybe it’s time to stop giving to the ALS Association at this point. And start giving to a few other charities instead.”

Aug 21

Seeing this busker in downtown, Toronto was a haunting reminder of how individuals with disabilities were presented as circus freaks back in the day. I was not alive at the time and yet it still haunts me. I am not sure why this man is abnormally tall and I believe that because of his bone structure it is not the result of genetics alone. Whatever his diagnosis is, I find it fascinating how he chose to dress up as Spock (not sure if it is due to his face or his height…though the facial resemblance is uncanny). As indicated by the tub on his belt with ‘tips for pics’ written on it, he is trying to make money by presenting himself in costume. Is this person doing this because it is the only job that society allows him to do based on his appearance? Is he making money because of his diagnosis? Is there nothing more to this and am I making more of it than meets the eye? Who knows. It just struck me as interesting because I know that people with disabilities do attempt to make money on the streets either as buskers or beggars (depending on where you are in the world). What can we do to change this? Does society feel the need to change this? Let’s ask the hard questions.

Seeing this busker in downtown, Toronto was a haunting reminder of how individuals with disabilities were presented as circus freaks back in the day. I was not alive at the time and yet it still haunts me. I am not sure why this man is abnormally tall and I believe that because of his bone structure it is not the result of genetics alone. Whatever his diagnosis is, I find it fascinating how he chose to dress up as Spock (not sure if it is due to his face or his height…though the facial resemblance is uncanny). As indicated by the tub on his belt with ‘tips for pics’ written on it, he is trying to make money by presenting himself in costume. Is this person doing this because it is the only job that society allows him to do based on his appearance? Is he making money because of his diagnosis? Is there nothing more to this and am I making more of it than meets the eye? Who knows. It just struck me as interesting because I know that people with disabilities do attempt to make money on the streets either as buskers or beggars (depending on where you are in the world). What can we do to change this? Does society feel the need to change this? Let’s ask the hard questions.

This phone stand is an inclusive tool (for people of all abilities) because it is great for those who want to look at notes while making presentations or those who need to keep time. A tablet stand would be even more inclusive because of the size. If only all educators encourage use of such tools to be used in classrooms.

This phone stand is an inclusive tool (for people of all abilities) because it is great for those who want to look at notes while making presentations or those who need to keep time. A tablet stand would be even more inclusive because of the size. If only all educators encourage use of such tools to be used in classrooms.

Aug 12

Autistic by Explanation

At breakfast this morning, one of the Counsellors at camp asked two brothers what kind of jobs they have. The elder able-bodied brother provided this explanation before telling the Counsellor what kind of job his brother had: He has Autism so he works at la di da place.

Why the label? Why do you need to highlight a person’s disability prior to providing further details/listing their achievements? Is the explanation REALLY necessary? His disability is not an invisible disability and even if it was, I don’t think an explanation is necessary nor appropriate. I recognize that his job is not a “regular job” that a mainstream able-bodied person of his age/maturity would participate in. What do you accomplish by pointing out his lack of ability in such a situation?

What really hit a nerve was that he did so nonchalantly while his brother was sitting right next to him. Not only are you identifying that he is “special” and does not fit in within society’s construction of the ”norm”, you are also doing it WHILE HE IS THERE. Where is the inclusivity? Why are you justifying why what he does is different, and perhaps unusual? If somebody did that to you, how would you feel?

(Source: anamorphosis-and-isolate, via escape-artistt)

goldenheartedrose:

Image description : neon pink heart suspended on a black string against a Grey striped shirt. Heart reads : “Autism is not a tragedy” with a puzzle piece symbol enclosed in a circle with a mark through it.

goldenheartedrose:

Image description : neon pink heart suspended on a black string against a Grey striped shirt. Heart reads : “Autism is not a tragedy” with a puzzle piece symbol enclosed in a circle with a mark through it.

“One of the biggest mistakes people make around accessibility is by starting only with access. I think access is a tool, a practice, an intervention for justice, but that access has to happen inside of a political container and that political container is disability justice; it has to happen for the sake of something. Access has to be done in service of something. What I mean is that access for the sake of access is not necessarily libratory, but access for the sake of connection, breaking isolation, love, justice and liberation is libratory.” — Mia Mingus (via disabilityhistory)

(via rampyourvoice)

Aug 11

Identify yourself first

I’m at a camp for the blind and at the dinner table, the Counsellors always identify themselves prior to serving us or clearing up the table. I’ve made it a habit to identify myself to individuals who have vision loss, but I feel the need to do so even with those who have perfect or almost perfect vision. In fact, I think it would be awesome if everyone did this with everyone, regardless of disABILITY. I’m going to try this and see what kind of reaction I receive from those who are able-bodied. YAY experiment!

You can try it out at your end. Simply start with, “Hi/Hello/Hey it’s <insert your name>.” Try it out.

Aug 10

[video]

Listening to people who have disability accents -

realsocialskills:

People with certain disabilities often have heavy disability accents. Their speech can sound very different from the way most nondisabled people speak.

People with disabilities that affect communication are often pushed into separate programs, particularly in adulthood. Even when they are in the…

(via givemeareasonto-love)

[video]

In the home, I had one nurse at a time, and she’d do everything I needed. Simple. I got used to that.

Here, even charge nurse RNs aren’t allowed to change the humidifier water bag, even though it’s essentially identical to the IV bags they could hang in their sleep, except easier. They can’t swap a water bag, because that is Sterile Water for Inhalation®, and though exactly identical to the sterile water nurses use for other things—wound care and so on—anything involving ventilation is the purview of Respiratory.
And since there are only two respiratory therapists for the North Campus, your lungs may dry out and form tumbleweeds before they get to it. It’s all fun and games until a tumbleweed blocks someone’s airway.

” —

Nick Dupree, “That’s Not My Job” (Angry Rant)”

If you have not been in institutionalized and want to know more about what it’s like and what kind of policy changes could help, read Nick Dupree’s blog. 

(via disabilityhistory)

[video]